Margaret Nahmias (magaretnahmias) wrote,
Margaret Nahmias
magaretnahmias

Spanish In Song Cuba Libre Gloria Estefan

[Note; there is an English version featured on her 1998 album Gloria, but I am focusing on the Spanish version for the purpose of this post. ]Note; there is an English version featured on her 1998 album Gloria, but I am focusing on the Spanish version for the purpose of this post.

In light of the protests in Cuba, I wanted to share this song. It is not really a protest song.  She probably wisely decided not to say anything against Castro specifically. But Like Mi Tierra, it expresses a desire to see her homeland but this time free.  She shares memories, but instead of about herself, it is more about the people she left behind.  Mi Tierra, to me, was more like feeling immediately after the exile. Cuba Libre expresses similar feelings after time has passed.  Unlike Mi Tierra, this is a little easier for me translates, so I will be providing the literal translation. If you want a singable version, please listen to the English version. Like all translated songs, it is more of a transcreation than an actual translation.


Curioso destino que aún me separa de mi tierra adorada que no veo desde  niña(x2


Curious  fate that still separates me from  my adored  land that I have not seen since I was a kid (x2)


Destino can be destiny or destination depending on the context. The concept of fate and place where one is going is in one word in  Spanish. Here, I decided to use fate to sound a little less formal.


Aún is one word for the adverb still the abut be careful without an accent pronounced approximately like awn and even the adverb. This example of how written accentuation helps distinguish between homographs and pronunciation. When the au has an accent, the letters are pronounced separately. The Spanish au sound similar to the ow in cow or now.


desde niño(a), since childhood


no puedo olvidar eres parte de mi te quiero ver feliz

I cannot forget you; you are part of me. I want to see you happy


Mí, the prepositional pronoun, is me in English.  Without the accent, it is the possessive my.  This is another example of the type of accentuation above. This gives Spanish an advantage when it comes to distinguishing homographs.


You can place the object pronoun in front of the conjugated verb or the infinitive in phrases with both.An alternative is Quiero verte feliz.  However, unlike in   Portuguese, the pronoun never goes in between the verbs.


Un mar de recuerdos azota mi mente de pueblos y gentes que yo he conocido X2

A sea of memories hits my mind of towns and people that I have known.


Azotar literally means to whip but can be used figuratively to mean hit with the particularly harsh or devastating connotation.   The RAE dictionary defines it as to cause damage of great importance.


Recuerdo is the memory as something remembered. Memoria refers to the faculty of remembering itself.


Since she is talking about the distant past and not people she recently met, I will assume the verb conocer means to know. An alternative is to meet for the first time, but it could be both depending on the writer’s intent. Conocer also means to know in the sense of being familiar with the person or place mainly.  Sometimes the line between the usage of saber and conocer can blur.


First verse repeats as pre-chorus


curioso destino que aún me separa curioso destino que aún me separa de mi tierra adorada que no veo desde niña de mi tierra adorada que no veo desde niña no puedo olvidar eres parte de mi te quiero ver feliz

Curious fate that still separates me from land m my adored that have not seen since I was a kid (x2) I cannot forget you you are part of me, I want to see you happy.


Chorus


Quiero mi cuba libre pa’ que la gente pueda pa’ que mi gente pueda bailar

I want my Cuba free so that the people can, my people can dance


Unlike the English word people, the Spanish equivalent gente is singular. This difference confuses learners of both languages who know the other.  Pa’ is an informal contraction of para. It is one of the few in Spanish.  Pa’ que is para que, so that, and it takes the subjunctive


a veces no entiendo lo mucho que   extraño a pesar de los años te sigo queriendo sigo esperando yo te sigo sonando comparte tus penas estoy contigo llorando

Sometimes I don’t understand how much I miss it.  Despite the years, I   still love you I keep hoping.  I keep dreaming of you.  I share your sorrow.  I am with you crying


Extrañar is how to say to miss in feeling the absence of someone or something in Latin America.  In Spain it is echar de menos


Cuantos is how much in quantity or extent.   It is used as a question word most often to ask for the amount. Lo mucho que in extent lo + adjective que is how much I tend to alternate between one or the other depending on its sounds.


Seguir + present participle it can also mean keeping in the sense of continuity.  It is also another way to still+ present participle. Both can be used here.


Pre chorus  repeats


no puedo olvidar eres parte de mi te quiero ver feliz

I cannot forget you; you are  a part of me. I want to see you happy.


Chorus repeat until the end.

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